Space

The chief executive of Avio affirms that the Vega rocket will be back in action soon

Summary

Avio’s CEO has affirmed that the company is pulling together its resources to develop an advanced Vega rocket that will cover up for the company’s previous failures. Giulio Ranzo gave a virtual statement outlining the cause of launch failure in […]

Avio’s CEO has affirmed that the company is pulling together its resources to develop an advanced Vega rocket that will cover up for the company’s previous failures. Giulio Ranzo gave a virtual statement outlining the cause of launch failure in the last mission as the inefficient combination of the propulsion system with the fourth stage. On the other hand, Arianespace, which sells and runs the Vega rockets, explained that the source of the problem was incorrect integration of the cables in the rocket propulsion system, prompting the control unit’s failure.

Ranzo promised Vega commercial customers and fanatics that the Vega rocket will be back in action sooner than anticipated provided the engineers complete the development and replacement of the units that malfunctioned.  Ranzo took the chance to apologize to the customers who lost their payloads to this unsuccessful mission. He explained that the malfunction would be resolved quickly and offer customers services to reclaim the Vega rocket’s reputation.

The company outlined that it had deployed over 14 successful missions before the first catastrophe mid last year. This mission was hosting UAE’s payload, and the problem emerged to be a technical malfunction of the second stage of the rocket. The next mission was successful and hosted 53 payloads in a rideshare mission.

SEOSATO-Ingenio satellite lost in the Vega mission was intended to boost the company’s reputation after its successful deployment. Nevertheless, the customer had less worry stating that the development had reached its technical high and they can manufacture similar satellites when they want. 

The SEOSATO-Ingenio was supposed to be Spain’s first satellite dedicated to observing Earth activities. ESA’s program manager, Dominique Gillieron, explained that the development of a satellite duplicate would be strenuous since they did not save spare components of the satellite hardware. Nonetheless, he noted that ESA is collaborating with Spain to develop a satellite replica with materials similar to those used.

Eutelsat refused to make any comments concerning the Vega rocket failure. The company stated that its 25-satellite constellation for the low-Earth orbit would proceed as scheduled with or without the ELO Alpha’s deployment.

Norwegian Space Agency’s chief of enterprise development and national space resources, Jon Harr, stated his certainty over Vega rocket bouncing back to its former glory. He added that their partnership to deploy the agency’s satellite via the Vega rocket would hold unless the company is barred from hosting other missions for a half to one year. In conclusion, Avio is hopeful that the technical changes will be complete to facilitate the resumption of missions via the Vega rocket. It will be exciting to witness a host of more projects coming in through Avio’s Vega rocket. 

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